Am I addicted?

It may not be that simple. All the while we were taking, we said to ourselves, “I can stop at any time.” Even if it actually was at first, now it’s different. Drugs manipulated us. We lived to take, we took to live. In simple terms, an addict is a person whose life is ruled by drugs.

You may admit that you have a drug problem, but you don’t think you’re addicted. Each of us had a pre-made opinion about who is addicted. Once you’ve started taking positive action, being addicted is nothing embarrassing. If you identify with our problems, you can also identify with our way of solving them.

The following questions were put together by addicts, recovering in NA. If you have doubts about whether you’re addicted or not, read them and try to answer as honestly as you can. S

    Answer the following questions:

    1
    Do you ever take alone?
    yesno
    2
    Have you ever, thinking that one drug is your problem, have you replaced it with another?
    yesno
    3
    Have you ever cheated or lied to a doctor to get needed prescriptions?
    yesno
    4
    Have you ever stolen or stolen drugs to obtain them?
    yesno
    5
    Do you regularly take when waking up or going to bed?
    yesno
    6
    Have you ever taken a drug to master the effects of another?
    yesno
    7
    Do you avoid places or people who don't approve of your drug use?
    yesno
    8
    Have you ever taken a drug without knowing what effect it might have or not knowing at all what you are taking?
    yesno
    9
    Have your work or school performance ever suffered from taking?
    yesno
    10
    Have you ever been stuck for taking?
    yesno
    11
    Have you ever lied about what or how much are you taking?
    yesno
    12
    Did you put drug purchases ahead of your financial obligations?
    yesno
    13
    Have you tried to stop or control the bite?
    yesno
    14
    Have you ever been in a prison, hospital or drug rehabilitation unit because of taking?
    yesno
    15
    Is taking disturbing your sleeping or eating?
    yesno
    16
    Does the thought of running out of drugs scare you?
    yesno
    17
    Do you think your life is impossible without drugs?
    yesno
    18
    Do you ever question your mental health?
    yesno
    19
    Does your taking make your home unhappy?
    yesno
    20
    Do you think you couldn't fit in and have fun without drugs?
    yesno
    21
    Have you ever felt threatened, guilty or ashamed of a binge?
    yesno
    22
    Do you think a lot about drugs?
    yesno
    23
    Have you had unjustified or undefined fears?
    yesno
    24
    Has the taking affected your sex life?
    yesno
    25
    Have you ever taken drugs that weren't your favorite?
    yesno
    26
    Have you ever taken because of emotional pain or stress?
    yesno
    27
    Have you ever overdosed on any drug?
    yesno
    28
    Are you still taking over and over again?
    yesno
    29
    Do you think you may have a drug problem?
    yesno

    ome of these questions don’t even mention drugs. This is because addiction is a very insidious disease that affects all areas of our lives – even those that at first glance have little to do with drugs. The drugs we used are not as important as the answer to the question of why we used them and what they did with us.

    When we first read these questions, the thought that we might be addicted was terrifying. Some of us tried to kill her in us, saying:
    “These questions are pointless”,
    Or
    “I am different. I know I’m taking, but I’m not addicted. I have real emotional, family problems, at work,”
    Or
    “It’s just hard for me to sort everything out,”
    Or
    “I will be able to stop when I find the right person, get a job, etc.”

    If you are addicted, you must first admit that you have a problem with drugs. Only then will progress towards recovery be possible. These questions, if you approached them honestly, can help you see how drugs have made you stop directing your life. Addiction is a disease that, if left untreated, ends in prison, hospital and death. Many of us went to NA because drugs stopped giving us what we expected of them. Addiction took away our pride, respect for ourselves, family, loved ones and even the desire to live. If you haven’t reached this stage, you don’t have to do it at all. We discovered that our own hell was within us. If you want help, you can find it in the Community of Anonymous Drug Addicts.

    “Looking for answers to our problems, we went to NA. We were on the first myth with a sense of defeat and we didn’t know what to expect. After one or more meetings, we began to feel that others care about us and that they wanted to help us. Although the mind told us it would not work out, the people in the community gave us hope by telling us that we would recover. Surrounded by other addicts, we realized that we are no longer alone. On myths we recover. We become blacksmiths of our own destiny. We found that the program works by putting recovery first. We came face to face with three harrowing facts:

    1. We are powerless against addiction and have lost control of our lives.

    2. Although we are not responsible for our illness, we are responsible for our recovery.

    3. We can no longer blame people, places and things for our addiction. We must face our problems and feelings.

    The most effective weapon in recovery is the recurrent addict.”

    Am I addicted?
    Literature approved by the NA Community.
    Copyright © 2005 by Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
    All rights reserved.

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